Trantler (Tree + Antler)

June 2020

Reclaimed Wood, Bronze

12.5 ft x 4 ft

Gearhart, Oregon, USA 

The name Trantler is based on combining two predominant elements in Gearhart: the wild elk that roam the region, and the timber industry that has been a cornerstone in the Pacific Northwest since 1848. Oregon is one of the world’s great tree-growing areas so it comes natural to celebrate its contribution to the state’s economy as well as the majestic beauty of its forests. Additionally,  the elk herd near Gearhart has become quite prevalent - growing from about thirty a decade ago to around one hundred and twenty members today. Both the timber industry and the elk herd have been sources of discussion within the community. The conversation regarding the environmental impacts of clear cutting versus its potential to diversify the local ecosystem is in debate. Concurrently, the dialogue around the elk herd being a charming attraction as opposed to the wild life creating safety issues still stands strong. This sculpture positions itself as an unbiased piece of artwork, aiming to observe the challenging aspects of human’s relationship with nature, and to promote critical thinking towards the connection between preserving our planet and protecting a healthy economy. The goal of the project is to bring residents and tourists together in hopes of more interaction and collaboration between each other and foster unity by showcasing varying ideologies within a community in a peaceful manner.

Water Retains Memory - Vessel 1

2020

Palm Tree Stump, Plaster, Paint, Resin, Coral

1.5 ft x 1.5 ft x 1 ft

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This piece is part of a series of artwork about water and how its content can be transformed through vulnerability. Water has a memory which makes an imprint of outside influences, remembering what occurs in the space surrounding it. As it has been widely used since antiquity as a symbol by which to express devotion and purity, this series concentrates on vessels inspired by nature which hold small bodies of water in specific, mapped out shapes.

Water Retains Memory - Vessel 2

2020

Wood Stump, Bondo, Gold Paint, Resin, Water

2 ft x 3 ft x 3 ft

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

This piece is part of a series of artwork about water and how its content can be transformed through vulnerability. Water has a memory which makes an imprint of outside influences, remembering what occurs in the space surrounding it. As it has been widely used since antiquity as a symbol by which to express devotion and purity, this series concentrates on vessels inspired by nature which hold small bodies of water in specific, mapped out shapes.

Otik

2017

Wood, Twine, Wax, Metal, Glue, Paint

4 ft x 5 ft x 4 ft

This piece celebrates diversity, compassion, and the concept that we are all one. After carving the rope image into the top part of the sculpture, I had to leave Italy for the United States. Stuffing it into my suitcase to make it through security, I sadly had to break off the smaller limbs - leaving only the main base of the branch in tact. After arriving in Los Angeles I salvaged broken sticks from various trees lying on the ground and attached them back on to the base with metal screws, glue, wax and copper painted twine to make the piece whole again.

Sewing Needle

2015

Driftwood, Paint, Metal Cable

8.2 ft x 2 in

This project examines perceptions about the logic behind human beings need to fix things - be it oneself or obstructions within our environment. This driftwood was found floating down the Arno river in Florence, Italy, during a torrential storm and then sculpted into a large sewing needle to symbolize the act of mending.

Bricks

2016

Broken Tiles/Bricks/Rocks from

Various Countries, Wax,

Oil Paint on cement slabs

4 ft x 4 ft

This project examines perceptions about the logic behind human beings need to fix things - be it oneself or obstructions within our environment. This is a collection of 50 broken tiles and bricks from various countries throughout the world, put back together in their assumed original shapes with oil colored wax.

Lead Feet

2015

Sticks, Rocks, Metal, Turmeric

6.5 ft x 6.5 ft x 3.2 ft

This sculpture is part of a series of work created on the concept of “Home.”  In addition to a body of sculptures, a collection of interviews, written statements, and audio recordings were created to share people’s ideas of what the word “Home” means to them. These were then saved in a weatherproof time capsule and buried for future generations to find.

Lean On Me

2020

Tree Bark, Plaster, Metal

17 in x 20 in x 25 in

This piece illustrates that water, earth, animals and humans are all interrelated and interdependent. The abundance of water on Earth’s surface and its unique combination of physical and chemical properties

are central to the planet’s dynamics. The conch shell is a symbol of Home. Human’s play an important role in keeping our environment clean and fresh - which is turn taking care of ourselves and building a safe future for all.